VVN/VVC Activity Brief: August 23rd, 2016

Vegas Video Network/Vegas Video Co-op Activity Brief for August 23rd, 2016.

In today’s activity brief, we cover. . .

Streamed live on Facebook Live at 10:16am, 8/23/16.

Here is an Excellent Way to Establish Yourself as an Expert

2We just wrapped a fascinating session for CO-OP Member Lathe Lavada. 

As we’ve said many times, claiming your own credibility is the weakest way to establish it.  Besides many of the techniques we teach CO-OP Members to bolster their credibility, an outstanding way to demonstrate your expertise is to be interviewed on a broadcast-quality morning talk show. Here in Las Vegas, you see it all the time.

So, for Lathe, we set out to create the same thing.

For the shoot, we developed a show which features an in-studio host interviewing a guest in a remote location. Lathe would be that guest. For this short video to look authentic, we needed five distinct elements:

  1. A nice ‘Morning Show’ opening video.
    We used the video to set the tone for the show. Bubbly, upbeat, fun.

  2. An in studio host on a well-appointed set.
    Using one of our customized virtual sets, we created a environment that featured the Las Vegas sign, a monitor behind the host with the show logo, and real-time lower thirds.

  3. Our guest in a remote location.
    We wanted to create the feeling of a network show by being able to visit remotely with “Lathe, who is visiting us from his radio show, Real Estate Rescue, LIVE”.

  4. Picture in picture capabilities during the interview.
    To keep Lathe on screen as much as possible, we also took advantage of our virtual set capabilities, which included some more very cool customization.

  5. Strong call to action in closing credits
    The final video used in this step provided a clear call to action for the viewer along with some additional branding of Lathe’s radio show.

As you can see in the graphic, we were able to achieve all of our objectives. 

What you may not recognize is all of this was shot in our studio AND done as a single take.  All elements were shot and recorded live.

Pretty spiffy, huh?

Lathe has had this content approved by one of the “top 3” networks here in Vegas for placement during their broadcast schedule.

Producing Videos That Sell – Tip #10: When Does Video Matter?

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If those of us at the VEGAS VIDEO CO-OP say video is important, it’s like Santa Claus saying Christmas is a good idea. It’s an expected statement from folks who are pre-disposed to such a belief. What is needed is an unbiased third party’s opinion. Like so. . .

According to Cisco, in 2013 66% of all Internet bandwidth was video. They predict that number will jump to 79% in 2018.

The reason?

Because video is important to people. And those people are your customers and prospects. Which means, video is important to you.

Why?

For all of the reasons listed in the previous “Producing Videos That Sell” tips. When done correctly, great video will human-enable your website. With a focus on authenticity and approachability, you can shorten the “getting to know you phase” of the sales cycle.  And because great sales people know it really is all about them, they use video to establish their credibility without claiming it.

Because putting these lessons to work helps you, it also helps your prospects quickly find a suitable match to their needs.

Good selling!

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Producing Videos That Sell – Tip #09: Search Engines LOVE Video

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Guess who owns YouTube, the #2 search engine in the world? Google, the #1 search engine in the world.

That explains why it is common to see YouTube videos at the top of search results. Google loves video and clearly gives video content priority over other results. By creating strong video content, and placing it online in the most effective search engine optimized ways, you separate yourself from the competitive herd and increase the probability of engagement.

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Producing Videos That Sell – Tip #08: Websites Increase Your Sales Cycle, Video (can) Shorten It

Las Vegas Video Production - Vegas Video Co-Op

I want you to think back for a second. Before there were websites, how did somebody learn about a business? More often than not, they picked up the phone and spoke directly to a person who was taught about who they were, what they did, and the problems they solved. Today, because of websites, a person never has to speak to anybody when deciding whether a company makes their short list.

As a result, your website acts like a brick wall with a bunch of “flyers” pasted on it. Because everybody thinks they’re smart, this explains why the average amount of time somebody spends on a website is one minute. This, in turn, increases the sales cycle versus being able to simply speak to a prospect.

Great video solves this problem. It keeps people on your website longer, allows you to properly establish your credibility, and human-enables your online presence.  This works because the very first step of the sales process, regardless of what methodology you use, is the getting to know you phase.

Competition is fierce. For a non-commodity product or service, I have to like you before I buy from you and your company.  Video, when done correctly, shrinks the sales cycle by satisfying the getting to know you phase. Additionally, if done correctly, your video will also create curiosity. A curious prospect will engage. A non-curious prospect. . .not so much.

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Producing Videos That Sell – Tip #07: Homemade Videos Are No Longer Charming

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Because the interest in video has continued to increase, many people attempt to shoot their own videos.

The problem?

Homemade videos are no longer charming. They present an amateur effort which reflects poorly on you.

It’s not a big leap to believe the quality of your video is likely equivalent to the quality of your offering. If you’re not willing to invest in your business, why should somebody invest in you?  Taken another way, your videos are your “best foot forward” when it comes to introducing yourself to your customers and prospects. Given that, if you’re not taking the effort to deliver the highest quality possible, many folks will equate that lack of effort to how you might treat them.

The challenge, of course, is cost and time.

You can easily spend $500 to several thousand dollars having a great video produced in a professional studio. And then when your video(s) are complete, it can take days or weeks to get the video in your hand.

The good news? This is a problem we solve.

For an unbelievably low monthly Membership fee, you can create as many videos as you’d like during your session.  And when your session is complete, you receive all your videos. . .right then and there.

Amateur videos reflect poorly on you, which hurts your credibility and ability to close business.

 

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Producing Videos That Sell – Tip #06: When Making Your Offer, DO NOT Focus on the Wrong Item

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If your offer was expressed as a mathematical expression, it would be:

OFFER = Delivery + Outcome

The vast majority of companies focus mostly on the delivery. . .that is, the things or activities which are delivered to a client. Your client, on the other hand, doesn’t care about the delivery.

They care about the OUTCOME.

The “ratio of importance” for the offer is 90/10, where 90% of your story should be about the outcome (or result) of working with you. 10% of you talk/video should be about how you’re going to make it happen.

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Producing Videos That Sell – Tip #05: Nobody Cares What You Do

Las Vegas Video Production

While it’s healthy to think of yourself as special, the truth is nobody cares what you do. They only care what you do for them. To the extent you focus less on what you do and more on the problem you solve, the effectiveness of your videos (and sales in general) increase.

I’ve said previously, you bond with people on their problems, not your solution. As I’ll discuss in an upcoming tip, it is the outcome that your present, whether it removes pain (“German Shepherd”) or increases pleasure (“Gold Medal”), that folks care about.

If you are unable to clearly define the problems your customers face, thereby demonstrating you understand the issues they face, you become “functionally equivalent” to all the other companies in your market which focus on what they (and you) do.

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Producing Videos That Sell – Tip #01: Claiming Your Own Credibility

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When a prospect watches your videos for the first time, you start with near-zero credibility. To try and solve that, most people begin by claiming their own credibility. We call this the “drunk guy at the party” syndrome.

You’re at a party, and a drunk guy comes up to you. He begins spewing all the things he does, and how much money he makes, and all the people he works with, and, “oh by the way here’s my card”.

What do you want to do? If you’re me, you want to run to the bar.

Guess what? Most websites and videos behave exactly like the drunk guy at the party.

Credibility must be earned. Instead of beginning your videos with some statement of self worth, recognize you bond with people on their problems, not your solution. To the extent you are able to accurately describe the issues facing your prospects, you immediately reduce the natural tendency people have to distrust, or “push back” on what you have to say.

You bond with people on their problems, not your solution.

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CO-OP Case Study: Personal Coaching – Establishing Credibility

Toward the end of 2013, we had a rush of new CO-OP Members. Interestingly, several “Personal Coaches” joined the CO-OP. One of whom is Eldridge DuFauchard.

When starting any business, it’s helpful to find a specific niche. . .something that helps separate you from the competitive herd. Eldridge has done just that. His niche? Helping folks who suffer from social anxiety.
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